Tag Archives: health

Learning how to fly with a broken wing – Taking care of myself after the damage is done

A personal diary/ accountability type of post today folks.

Please note: there are a lot of links in this post but none are affiliate links.  They are all informational and to support what I’m saying in the post

For years, I’ve dealt with food allergies and gaining or having difficulty losing weight.  It never got out of hand but I could feel how the extra weight made sports harder and I was a lot more tired than I should be after relatively little exercise.  And getting the energy up TO exercise? Yeah, that becomes a vicious circle.  Add to this a couple of compressed disks in my back and it’s a recipe for a sedentary lifestyle.

Lately even lifting a vintage sewing machine has become cumbersome. Continue reading Learning how to fly with a broken wing – Taking care of myself after the damage is done

Back in the Saddle – Take care of your back

Ergonomics Part 1: (This post ended up far longer than I’d intended (yeah, shocking, I know!), so I will split it into 2, and offer you part 2 tomorrow.)

Lately, I’ve noticed that I hunch a lot when I sew.  This is on the longarm or at the domestic machines.   The result of this is that I “hurt” and I can’t sew for long periods of time.  So I thought I’d talk today a little about ergonomics, both at the stand up and sit down types of machines and your cutting table. Continue reading Back in the Saddle – Take care of your back

diet and Diets – small D vs big D

My dad’s a personal trainer. He’s looked at most of the diets, and typically has the same thing to say about all of them

Here’s what I’ve grown up having drilled into my head:

  • Your brain needs carbs to function. It cannot digest protein for food. This does not mean all carbs all the time. This does not mean white flour and empty carbs. Those are not proper nutrition for your brain or body. But you cannot unilaterally cut carbs out of your diet.
  • All carbs are not equal. Continue reading diet and Diets – small D vs big D