Tag Archives: repair

Throwback Thursday – Project F-250 Revamp

Here’s my version of “Throwback Thursday” 😉  This is a post I made back in 2009 when I was still in charge of BanditAlley, as a blog post there.  Recording it here on AA for posterity.

Seeing that I can do this, you’d think I could polish up a sewing machine like nobody’s business, wouldn’t you?  Not so.  Though a lot of the process is the same, I just can’t seem to bring up the shine on a sewing machine the way this truck finally shone.  It’s probably because I can’t use a power polisher on the machine like I can with a car or a bike.

The victim:  A 2000 Ford F-250 Diesel. Previously dark green in color, but likely painted when it was recovered as a roll-over in the first year of its life.   Continue reading Throwback Thursday – Project F-250 Revamp

A little more love – What you don’t see can make your machine sick

Sometimes people will find out that I service sewing machines and tell me that they do their own servicing.

I always ask them how involved they get, and at least 9 times out of 10 they’ll tell me they brush out (or blow out – and I usually tell them that’s not recommended) the lint, and oil where it says to in the owner’s manual.

Believe it or not, when a sewing machine repair shop does a cleaning and tune-up for you, they do more than that.  Inside your machine there are a lot more places to oil and clean and adjust than what the owner will typically see. Continue reading A little more love – What you don’t see can make your machine sick

Greased Lightning – Singer motor lube in Canada

Update 06-30-2016:  The latest batch of Singer Lube I received from the supplier is no longer suitable for use in Singer motors.  As such, I’m recommending the use of Petroleum jelly.

People far smarter than me are recommending it and White Sewing machine motors of the same time period used it.

 

Over the last few months, I’ve been hearing that Singer Lube / Lubricant / Motor Lube (S2129)  is getting really hard to find, especially here in Canada. This has been my experience as a consumer as well.  Walmart used to carry it, but no longer.  I believe that it may have been at Fabricland at one point.  Also, no longer.  With the loss of the Singer store in Edmonton, there were no longer any options I was aware of in my area. Continue reading Greased Lightning – Singer motor lube in Canada

Love becomes Electric – Electrical Safety and your sewing machine

*Note:  The photo above is of a mis-assembled power connector.  This is an example of what not to do, or Love becoming Electric – which is the topic of this conversation today.

Today, I want to talk about the electrical connections in your vintage machines.  In particular, the topic will be when you’re using the machine and you feel a tingle, or a light shock, or buzzing sensation. Continue reading Love becomes Electric – Electrical Safety and your sewing machine

Vintage machines – What’s a servicing worth?

I received an email today that I just have to talk about.  It’s not the particular email, but the type of email I get fairly regularly.

From time to time, I sell a fully serviced vintage sewing machine on the local buy and sell.  Every time I post one of these machines, I will mention that I’m selling the machine for less than the price of a tune-up. Continue reading Vintage machines – What’s a servicing worth?

Bobbin’ Along – bobbin tension

You may have noticed in the previous post about tension that we didn’t even test sew the machine.

Yet.  We will test sew it, but not just yet.  You see what I’m trying to do is get the machine to a point where it’s in the ballpark first, then the rest is just small tweaks.  The goal is to help you rule out the big problems, the ones that require repair, or in drastic situations, possibly a trip to the sewing machine spa.

Consider this statement:

Tension too tight on the top can also be tension too loose on the bottom.
Top Tension too tight does not automatically mean bottom tension is too loose.
Tension too loose on the top can also be tension too tight on the bottom.
Top Tension too loose does not automatically mean bottom tension is too tight. Continue reading Bobbin’ Along – bobbin tension 

Fragile Tension – Tension does not have to equal stress (Updated with a video)

Possibly the most common reason a machine ends up on my bench is for tension.  Usually bird’s nests.  The thing is easily 80% of the time, there’s nothing really wrong with the machine that a repair person needs to look at it.  Sometimes it’s basic maintenance, sometimes it’s because someone told you at some point “DON’T YOU TOUCH THAT! EVER!”

I’m sure that the people who’ve said that meant well, but today I’m going to show you how to manage that dial properly and what to do when it’s not proper. Continue reading Fragile Tension – Tension does not have to equal stress (Updated with a video)

“Machine works and is in good condition”… really?

I had a lady contact me about a few machines she wanted to sell.
I wasn’t interested in all of them, but 2 piqued my interest, the Singer 185J, because I knew someone who wanted it, and the Pfaff 362, because I thought it would be interesting to play with. Continue reading “Machine works and is in good condition”… really?

Ouch! Watch those hinges!

Ronnie - 1950 Featherweight 221
Ronnie – 1950 Featherweight 221

On Monday I was packing up my things to go to our Sewing Circle.  I was in a hurry, and when I grabbed the case of the featherweight I found last month, I managed to rip a 1.5″ long gash in my left hand.

Now, I’m naturally clumsy, but this only happened because Continue reading Ouch! Watch those hinges!

Well, I didn’t expect that….

I had a 301 brought to me last month.  I was told that it didn’t run.  That’s all I’d been told.  Strangely when I plugged it in, it ran just fine.   I told the owner I’d tune it up and get it back to them.

I did a basic clean up on it, then I started oiling.  I started at the top the way I always do.  I worked my way to the faceplate and cleaned and oiled in there.  Then I turned the machine on its back and got ready to clean and oil the bottom of the machine.

As I rocked it on its back, I heard the sound of “pieces” moving around with the inertia I’d created.

Huh?

Continue reading Well, I didn’t expect that….